Cosmetic Dental Crowns versus Cosmetic Veneers / Bonding

First appearances are important, and nothing stands out quite as well at your smile.

Last week, we talked about the difference between porcelain veneers and cosmetic bonding. Veneers and bonding are a nice intermediate option to crowns.  However, not everyone is a suitable candidate. Veneers and bonding can still develop tooth decay and can eventually require a dental crown for full tooth coverage.

Here is the basics of what you need to know about cosmetic crowns.

When should I get a Dental Cosmetic Crown?

Dental crowns can give you a beautiful, uniform smile and also protect the tooth from further decay and or breakage.  Crowns are often used when the overall size of the chip or crack would require more coverage than a veneer or bonding can provide.

The Procedure.

Preparing the tooth for a cosmetic crown usually requires 2 steps.  The first appointment requires the enamel of the tooth to be reduced by approximately ½ millimeter on ALL sides to allow the crown to completely cover the entire tooth.

The dentist will take an impression, and the crown will be made off-site at a dental laboratory.  The dentist will make the patient a temporary crown to wear over the next 3 weeks while the crown is being made at the dental lab.  It is important that the temporary crown remains on and intact during this time, to reduce sensitivity and to insure there is no distortion to the prepared tooth.

Pros & Cons.

Crowns last longer than veneers or bonding, and serve a greater purpose by protecting your tooth from further decay.

However, crowns require more enamel removal and requires a temporary crown while the permanent crown is being made. Crowns also tend to cost a bit more than veneers, but it depends on your insurance.

TALK TO YOUR DENTIST.

It is always a good idea to discuss the best option for you with your dentist.  An initial consultation and examination is required before undergoing any of the above procedures. If you need a local Austin dentist, schedule a consultation with one of our experienced dentists at one of our 9 Austin locations by calling us at (512) 452-8200 or scheduling online.

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